Events


Sunday, 25 June 2017
NAIDOC Week 2017 - Our Languages Matter

NAIDOC WEEK 2017

The importance, resilience and richness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages will be the focus of national celebrations marking NAIDOC Week 2017.


The 2017 theme - Our Languages Matter - aims to emphasise and celebrate the unique and essential role that Indigenous languages play in cultural identity, linking people to their land and water and in the transmission of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history, spirituality and rites, through story and song.


Some 250 distinct Indigenous language groups covered the continent at first (significant) European contact in the late eighteenth century. Most of these languages would have had several dialects, so that the total number of named varieties would have run to many hundreds.

Today only around 120 of those languages are still spoken and many are at risk of being lost as Elders pass on.

National NAIDOC Committee Co-Chair Anne Martin said languages are the breath of life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and the theme will raise awareness of the status and importance of Indigenous languages across the country.

“Aboriginal and Torres Strait languages are not just a means of communication, they express knowledge about everything: law, geography, history, family and human relationships, philosophy, religion, anatomy, childcare, health, caring for country, astronomy, biology and food.

“Each language is associated with an area of land and has a deep spiritual significance and it is through their own languages, that Indigenous nations maintain their connection with their ancestors, land and law,” Ms Martin said.

Committee Co-Chair Benjamin Mitchell hopes that the theme will shine a spotlight on the programs and community groups working to preserve, revitalise or record Indigenous languages, and encourage all Australians to notice the use of Indigenous languages in their community.

“There is currently a wave of activity, with people in many communities working to learn more about their language, and to ensure they are passed on to the next generation before it is too late.’ Mr Mitchell said.

“Nationally, many place names for our suburbs, rivers, mountains and parks are Indigenous language words. Noticing and paying attention to these words will generate greater appreciation and respect for the significance of language among all Australians.

"The preservation and revitalisation of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages - the original languages of this nation - is the preservation of priceless treasure, not just for Indigenous peoples, but for everyone."

GET INVOLVED

NAIDOC WEEK 2017 LOGONAIDOC celebrations are held around Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

The week is celebrated not just in the Indigenous communities but also in increasing numbers of government agencies, schools, local councils and workplaces.

Here are some ideas on how to celebrate NAIDOC Week:

  • Display the National NAIDOC Poster or other Indigenous posters around your classroom or workplace.
  • Get your copy of the 2017 Poster here
  • Start your own hall of fame featuring Indigenous role models.
  • Listen to Indigenous musicians or watch a movie about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history.
  • Make your own Indigenous trivia quiz.
  • Study a famous Indigenous Australian.
  • Research the traditional Indigenous owners of your area.
  • Study Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts and crafts.
  • Create your own Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander art.
  • Run an art competition for your school or community.
  • Research Indigenous history online or visit you library to find books about Aboriginal and Torres Strait peoples.
  • Visit local Indigenous sites of significance or interest.
  • Learn the meanings of local or national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander place names and words.
  • Invite local Indigenous Elders to speak or give a Welcome to Country at your school or workplace.
  • Invite an Indigenous sportsperson or artist to visit you.
  • Invite Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander dancers to perform.
  • Host a community BBQ or luncheon.
  • Hold a flag raising ceremony.
  • Organise a smoking ceremony.

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